Do You Tip Edible Arrangements Delivery? Ultimate Guide

fruit bouquet

Edible Arrangements is one of the most well-known and popular gifts and bouquet arrangers in the US with 1000+ stores and a massive $400 million-plus turnover.

If you’ve ordered an arrangement from them you might be wondering whether you need to tip the delivery guy when he arrives at your address.

Tipping etiquette is a key part of US culture and it also needs to be considered when managing your budget.

If you tip too often or too much you could be wasting hundreds of dollars a year. If you fail to tip at all, then you may fall outside of common customs.

To help you decide whether to tip Edible Arrangements, we’ve done some digging and will bring you up to speed with what the tipping customs are, how much Edible Arrangements delivery drivers earn, how much an arrangement will cost from Edible Arrangements, and much more.

Keep reading to find out…

Do You Tip Edible Arrangements? The Short Answer

There is no common custom to say that you have to tip Edible Arrangements drivers. You wouldn’t usually tip if you’re receiving an arrangement as a gift. If not, then you can decide to tip and you may feel this is warranted given Edible Arrangement’s delivery drivers earn fairly modest salaries.

How Much Do Edible Arrangement Drivers Earn? Do They Need Tips?

Most people will acknowledge that some workers simply need tips to get by.

If they don’t get tips then they’re likely to struggle to meet ends meet because of their low base salaries.

Indeed, this is what we found when we look at whether to tip pizza delivery, whether to tip furniture assembly and whether to tip at buffets.

But what about Edible Arrangements employees?

We’ve taken a look at the data provided by Indeed and it transpires that Edible Arrangements pay their drivers fairly low wages:

Edible Arrangements RoleSalary
Courier$29,940 per year
Delivery Person$10.99 per hour
Driver $17.94 per hour
Driver’s Helper$11.37 per hour
Source:Indeed

From these stats, it’s clear to see that if you drive for Edible Arrangements, you’re likely to be receiving a below-par salary when you contrast it to the average yearly salary in the US, which according to Mint.Intuit, is $56,310 per year.

It would seem that Edible Arrangements drivers could probably do with a little helping hand to boost their income and this might persuade you that a tip is warranted.

Can Edible Arrangements Drivers Accept Tips?

We couldn’t find anything to suggest that their drivers are banned from taking tips.

However, Edible Arrangements is a franchise company so some branches may implement their own rules on tipping so don’t be offended if a driver turns down your tip – it might be that he’s been told not to accept them.

How Much Do Edible Arrangements Goods Cost?

Another important factor in deciding how much to tip (if anything) might be what Edible Arrangements is going to charge you for their goods.

Let’s take a look at some examples:

ItemCost
Sweet Summer Daisy Fruit Bouquet Arrangement$49.99
Birthday Cupcakes and Dipped Fruit Indulgence Kit$25.98
Classic Indulgence Box$29.99
Rainbow and Butterflies Bouquet $49.99

This represents roughly the average cost of items at Edible Arrangements, although some items such as the Strawberry Fruit Topped Cheesecake are sold for as little as $4.99.

At the other end of the spectrum, there are items like the Birthday Fruit Bouquet which will set you back $102.98, with some items like the Chocolate Abundance costing up to $1200.

We found that these costs are quite standard in this industry. They’re priced about right from what we can see having examined some of their competitors.

How Much to Tip Edible Arrangements Delivery?

The standard rate for a tip in the US is 10-20% of the goods or services purchased.

Here’s what you get at checkout when ordering from Edible Arrangements:

As you’ll see, delivery is free but you do pay a sales tax and service fee.

The service fee is for “operator costs” but it doesn’t say whether it’s for a tip for the delivery driver and we assume it’s not.

If you applied the 10-20% rate to this order you’d be tipping $5-$10.

Obviously, if you do wish to tip you can also decide to tip a fixed sum not based on the 10-20% figure and we’d say $5-20 is ample depending on the size of your order.

Tipping in Other Ways

Of course, there’s more than one way to skin a cat and you may decide that a monetary tip isn’t justified for this particular service.

But you might decide to tip another way such as by:

  • Verbally praising the driver
  • Offering food or a drink
  • a Thank You card
  • Leaving a Google review for the driver

When and When Not To Tip the Edible Arrangements Driver?

While tipping isn’t customary in this industry and no heads are going to be turned if you decide to not tip, there might be certain scenarios where you feel obliged to tip.

For example:

  • If the driver goes beyond the call of duty. For example, if he delivers down a frozen and slippery driveway or comes out in bad snow;
  • If it’s the holidays;
  • If the driver is professional or courteous

You may also decide that tip can’t be justified if:

  • The order is incorrect or damaged
  • Delivery is made to the wrong address or is late or outside your allocated time slot.
  • The driver is rude or discourteous
  • If you’re receiving the goods as a gift

Final Thoughts

There are no hard and fast rules when it comes to tipping a service like Edible Arrangements.

It certainly isn’t customary to tip their drivers but given they earn below-average salaries you might feel it is warranted.

If you do decide to tip then $5-$20 will suffice or you could apply the standard 10-20% to work out your tip that way.

However, if you receive an Edible Arrangements delivery as a gift, then there’s no need to tip.

When people give gifts, they don’t generally expect that the recipient will need to contribute to the cost.

About the author

Oliver graduated from law school in 2008 and has practiced exclusively in the field of civil litigation for the last 10 years. He has a wealth of experience and expertise in litigation involving complex quantum and large financial losses. He has achieved numerous 7 figure settlements and has been involved in multi-billion dollar class-action consumer lawsuits against companies such as the Volkswagen Group. Away from the law, he is a personal finance writer, having been featured in key publications such as Yahoo Finance, GO Banking Rates, NewsBreak, MEL Magazine, and many more.



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